Our Latest News and Events

Notice of Public Board Meeting on Wednesday 6 June 2018

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Notice of Public Board Meeting on Wednesday 6 June 2018

The next meeting in public of the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust NHS Trust Board will take place on Wednesday 6 June 2018 commencing at 1145h in the Board Room at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Headquarters.

         

Members of the public and press are welcome to attend. The agenda for the public part of the meeting is available on the website.

Questions for the Board should be received by the Trust Board Administrator no later than 24hrs prior to the meeting by post or e-mail to: Trust Board Administrator, Claire Kettle at the Management Offices or via email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dame Yve Buckland

Chairman

Public Bodies (Admissions to Meetings) Act 1960

Members of the Public and Press are entitled to attend these meetings although the Trust Board reserves the right to exclude, by Resolution, the Press and Public wherever publicity would be prejudicial to the public interest by reason of the confidential nature of the business to be transacted or for other special reasons, stated in the Resolution

ROH leads the way with innovative knee therapy

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Spherox, a new therapy that could help people across the UK currently living with knee pain, is now available on the NHS.

 
Today, for the first time in the UK, a patient will undergo an operation using his own cells to repair defective cartilage in his knee at The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital (ROH) in Birmingham. The personalised therapy, called Spherox, has been shown to significantly reduce pain and improve quality of life in patients with cartilage defects, and is now available to eligible patients on the NHS.
 
The 30 year old patient, Dan McKenzie, injured his knee six years ago, when he was training to be a football coach. A year after the initial injury, Dan’s doctors found that not only had he torn the ligaments in his knee, but he had also caused significant damage to the cartilage (cushioning) in the joint.
 
“I’ve been living with this pain for six years now. While there are some days that I find the pain manageable, there are other days that the pain is so terrible that I can’t climb the stairs,” said Dan. “I feel lucky to be able to try this new therapy under the care of leading specialists at The ROH. I’m hopeful that this new therapy will help me get back into sport – and perhaps also playing football again one day.”
 
dan
Image courtesy of BBC MIdlands Today
 
Cartilage found in knee joints acts as a shock absorber and can be worn away through trauma, repetitive injury or “wear and tear”. As this happens the bones begin to grate against each other resulting in difficulty moving and joint stiffness. It is estimated that every year in the UK, around 10,000 people have knee cartilage damage serious enough to require treatment. While smaller injuries can be treated successfully with other methods, those with mid- to larger injuries to their cartilage would benefit from this novel treatment.
 
Spherox, developed by German-based company CO.DON, is a personalised treatment that is developed using a sample of healthy cartilage cells from a patient’s own knee. The cells are then grown in a laboratory using CO.DON’s innovative biological techniques, condensing the healthy cells into spheroids (spherical balls). In this first UK operation, key-hole surgery will be used to re-implant these spheroids back into the patient’s knee where the healthy cartilage will use them as building blocks to repair itself naturally.

“There are limited options available on the NHS for managing cartilage defects larger than 2cm2, so we are very pleased to have this new treatment option and to be the first hospital in the UK to use it,” said Professor Martyn Snow, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon at The ROH in Birmingham. “Now that it is more accessible, we look forward to being able to help more patients who qualify for the treatment.”


About the Spherox treatment

Spherox has been widely used in Germany for cartilage defects of larger than 2cm. After completion of rehabilitation, Spherox offers 88% improvement of activities of daily living,3 which include walking up and down stairs, getting in and out of a car, or walking on a flat surface. Without treatment, cartilage injuries of this size can go on to cause greater cost to both the patients’ QoL and to the NHS, as the joint may develop arthritis or progress to complete loss of cartilage requiring a knee replacement. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the UK body responsible for recommending cost-effective medicine, have determined that at £14,845 per operation, Spherox is to be available on the NHS to eligible patients with cartilage defects of up to 10cm2 in size.

Notice of Public Board Meeting on Wednesday 2 May 2018

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The next meeting in public of the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust NHS Trust Board will take place on Wednesday 2 May 2018 commencing at 1030h in the Board Room at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Headquarters.

Members of the public and press are welcome to attend. The agenda for the public part of the meeting is available on the website.

Questions for the Board should be received by the Trust Board Administrator no later than 24hrs prior to the meeting by post or e-mail to: Trust Board Administrator, Claire Kettle at the Management Offices or via email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dame Yve Buckland

Chairman

Public Bodies (Admissions to Meetings) Act 1960

Members of the Public and Press are entitled to attend these meetings although the Trust Board reserves the right to exclude, by Resolution, the Press and Public wherever publicity would be prejudicial to the public interest by reason of the confidential nature of the business to be transacted or for other special reasons, stated in the Resolution

Notice of Public Board Meeting on Wednesday 4 April 2018

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The next meeting in public of the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust NHS Trust Board will take place on Wednesday 4 April 2018 commencing at 1100h in the Board Room at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Headquarters.        

Members of the public and press are welcome to attend. The agenda for the public part of the meeting is available on the website.

Questions for the Board should be received by the Trust Board Administrator no later than 24hrs prior to the meeting by post or e-mail to: Trust Board Administrator, Claire Kettle at the Management Offices or via email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Notice of Public Board Meeting on Wednesday 7 March 2018

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The next meeting in public of the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust NHS Trust Board will take place on Wednesday 7 March 2018 commencing at 1130h in the Board Room at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Headquarters.

Members of the public and press are welcome to attend. The agenda for the public part of the meeting is available on the website.

Questions for the Board should be received by the Trust Board Administrator no later than 24hrs prior to the meeting by post or e-mail to: Trust Board Administrator, Claire Kettle at the Management Offices or via email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dame Yve Buckland

Chairman

Public Bodies (Admissions to Meetings) Act 1960

Members of the Public and Press are entitled to attend these meetings although the Trust Board reserves the right to exclude, by Resolution, the Press and Public wherever publicity would be prejudicial to the public interest by reason of the confidential nature of the business to be transacted or for other special reasons, stated in the Resolution

Pioneering robotic-arm assisted surgery at The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital

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The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham has today announced it is to further build upon its reputation as a pioneering centre of world-class surgical excellence by introducing robotic-arm assisted surgery for the first time.

The hospital, home to one of the largest and most respected specialist orthopaedic surgery units in Europe, has confirmed it has invested in new robotic-arm assisted hip replacement technology.

The advanced Stryker Mako robotic-arm assisted surgery transforms the way joint replacement surgery is performed, enabling the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital’s team of highly-trained surgeons to operate with even more accuracy.

The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital will introduce the revolutionary surgery in its newly launched Woodlands Suite.

How robotic-arm assisted surgery works

Professor Edward Davis, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, said: “The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital has been pioneering care in the field of orthopaedics since its inception and this investment in leading-edge technology represents another exciting chapter in that story.

“With this technology we can provide each patient with a personalised surgical experience based on their specific diagnosis and anatomy.

“Using a virtual 3D model, Mako allows surgeons to create each patient’s surgical plan pre-operatively. During surgery, we can validate that plan and make any necessary adjustments while guiding the robotic-arm to execute that plan.

“It’s exciting to be able to offer this transformative technology to in our newly created Woodlands Suite offering state-of-the-art care to patients at every step of their journey through the process from planning to post-operative recuperation and care.”

Hip replacements in the UK

Osteoarthritis was the main diagnosis for primary hip replacement and almost exclusively the diagnosis for primary knee replacement during the 2016 calendar year, in 90 per cent and 99 per cent of cases respectively.

The Mako Total Hip application is a treatment option for adults who suffer from degenerative joint disease of the hip. During surgery, the surgeon guides the robotic-arm during bone preparation to prepare the hip socket and position the implant according to the pre-determined surgical plan.  In medical studies, Mako total hip replacement has been shown to be four times more accurate and reproducible than manual total hip replacement procedures.

One of the first people to undergo the procedure at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital is Margaret Parkes, who is in her 70s and lives in Halesowen. She said: ‘I’m so pleased with how my hip replacement went. It’s only been 24 hours since the procedure and I’ve already walked and even been up and down the stairs. I can’t believe how little pain there is.

“Professor Davis and the whole theatre team were a great support and allayed any fears I had beforehand. The Mako robotic arm technology the surgeons use is truly fascinating. I would totally recommend this surgery to anyone.”

Professor Davis said: “We are proud to be the first NHS hospital to offer this highly advanced robotic technology in the UK.

“The addition of Mako to our orthopaedic service line further demonstrates our commitment to provide the community of Birmingham, the West Midlands and beyond with outstanding healthcare.”

How you can find out more

 At present, robotic-arm assisted surgery is being offered to private patients but will in time become available to NHS patients. If you’d like to find out more about whether robotic-arm assisted surgery is right for you, please visit www.woodlandssuite.com

Young cancer patient raises £700 for ROH

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This winter, one of our long-term patients, Bethan has been hard at work raising money for the ROH!

Bethan was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma, a primary bone cancer over five years ago. She celebrated the start of her bone cancer remission on the 11 January this year by holding a remission party for 60 children. Her guests paid £1 to dress up, eat cake and have a fun games afternoon.

Bethan and her family have been busy raising money for our Charitable Fund including hosting various events from a pub quiz to a Christmas fayre.

Following treatment from our Oncology and Paediatric teams and other teams in the NHS, Bethan and her family decided to show their thanks and support by raising a whopping £25k for hospital charities in the UK.

The family have really appreciated the care and emotional support they have received and have been very complimentary about our children’s ward, including our Macmillan Nurses, Jane Forsythe our Sarcoma Specialist and our oncology consultant Professor Abudu. Bethan’s mum Lynne said;

“Professor Abudu is someone we trust implicitly and who has been fully involved with Bethan’s care from the onset and who takes a genuine interest in her life and interests. Seeing our daughter fight and survive bone cancer has changed us forever.”

After 5 years of appointments, consultations and operations we are pleased to say Bethan is now in remission! We wish her the very best for the future and we thank Bethan, Lynne and the whole family for all the money they have raised for our charity!

 

Find out more about how you can support our charity here: www.rohcharity.org